Stern Math is a hands-on approach to learning, one where students actively participate. Students contribute to their own education and through an intuitive, guided system they develop a concrete, as well as, an abstract understanding of mathematical principles while having fun.

News & Updates

  • Part 2: Stern Math training on Zoom We are pleased to announce part two of our Stern Math workshop series for teachers and parents on Zoom, led by Stern Math teacher trainer Temple Ary, M.Ed! Part 2: Three Saturdays May 15, 22; June 5 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST $200 total for 9 hours of instruction Session 1 – Multiplication and Telling Time Session […] Read more →
  • Stern Math training on Zoom We are pleased to announce that Stern Math teacher trainer Temple Ary, M.Ed. will be offering a series of workshops for teachers and parents on the Stern Math materials via Zoom! Part 1: Four Saturdays January 23, 30; February 6, 13 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST $300 total for 12 hours of instruction ($25 per hour) […] Read more →

More Stern Math news and updates...

  • Children use the Number Track 1-20 to figure out what pairs with 16 to add up to 20.
  • Using two puppets, Mr. No and Mr. Yes, Catherine Stern playfully teaches children to shake hands.
  • Child uses the Dual Board to show 47.
  • Teacher works with children using the Counting Board.
  • A child at Castle School in 1950, placing the 7-block into the early version of the Counting Board.
  • Catherine Stern teaching with the Pattern Boards 1950 at Castle School which she set up and ran with Peggy Bassett Stern and Toni Gould. To the left of Catherine is her grandson, Fred Stern.
  • Children use the Number Track 1-20 to figure out what pairs with 12 to add up to 20.
  • Mr. Yes shakes hands. But Mr. No refuses! Catherine Stern playfully teaches the children to shake hands.
  • Catherine Stern teaches numbers 1 to 10 using an early version of the Counting Board without the symbol guide. She invented the symbol guide a few years later.
"I believe, that her (Catherine Stern's) idea is sound and would be of real value in the teaching of the elements of arithmetic."
—Professor Albert Einstein